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Practicing open data: publishing court decisions in Germany

In order to hold government to account, people need to know what it is doing. That is why it is so important for civil society to be able to have access to information on all types of government actions. Advocating for what we call “open data” is at the heart of the anti-corruption movement. In […]

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Fighting corruption in Greece must be a priority

Greece now has a new government, its fourth in six years. One of the returning Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ priorities remains constant: to fight of corruption. Previous incarnations of this government had appointed a minister to strengthen this fight. This was definitely a good move but it did not deliver. The previous minister of state […]

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Image credit:, CC BY-SA 2.0 via Flickr

Incentivizing integrity in banks is more than just paying some fines

Three German banks Commerzbank, HypoVereinsbank and the state-owned HSH-Bank have just settled with tax authorities in Nordrhein-Westfalen on illegal aid to tax evasion. The banks assisted clients in shifting their funds from Luxembourg to Panama to put the money out of reach of German tax authorities. While the settlements partially provide for 8-digit fines, they […]

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Подготовке Чемпионата мира по футболу 2018 нужна прозрачность

В 2010 году Российской Федерации было присуждено право проведения Чемпионата мира по футболу 2018 года. После Зимних Олимпийских Игр 2014, Чемпионат мира станет вторым по величине спортивным событием в истории современной России. На проведение мероприятия правительство Российской Федерации утвердило бюджет в 660 млрд. рублей (16 млрд. долл. США).  335 млрд. рублей (8 млрд. долл. США) […]

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The 2018 World Cup in Russia must be transparent

In 2010 Russia was awarded the right to host the next FIFA World Cup. After the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, the 2018 World Cup will become the second major international sports event held in the country in its recent history. The Russian government approved a total budget of 660 billion roubles (US$16 billion) for the […]

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Georgia: protect the messengers who protect citizens’ rights

In the past year there have been a number of high-profile verbal attacks on the leaders of civil society organisations in Georgia who take issue with some of what the government is doing. Rather than trying to undermine the messengers, the government should listen to the concerns they represent. In January a former prime minister […]

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UK company transparency: one less place to hide

It’s finally happened. UK legislation requiring the true owners of UK companies to be made public, received the final sign off in Parliament last week. Under the new law, UK-registered companies must submit information on their true owners – such as full name and nationality – to Companies House which up until now has not […]

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Give us our daily scandal

When Transparency International announces the results of the Corruption Perceptions Index in December and Italy performs badly again, there will always be at least one commentator who feigns surprise. How could it happen? Italy has the same score as Bulgaria and Senegal again? The index must be wrong.’ The writer unquestionably accepts the scores for […]

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Northern shadows: Norway doesn’t always practise what it preaches

Norway regularly features near the top of rankings for quality of governance, health and education, including Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index. In 2014 it was ranked by this index as the fifth cleanest country in the world, out of 175 countries. It is one of the few resource-rich countries that have managed to escape the resource curse, […]

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To the new Greek government: keep your promise to fight corruption

During the last ten years Greek politicians have always promised to fight corruption during election periods. However, after coming to power the results were meagre. In 2005 Konstantinos Karamanlis did not follow through on his campaign promises. In 2009 George Papandreou’s commitments produced a good law that required the publication of all government decisions and budgets […]

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