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Time for action: Lebanese citizens against corruption

With more than 1 million Syrian refugees settling into Lebanon, the need to protect this vulnerable population from the inevitable onslaught of corruption that often follows displacement is crucial more than ever before. With this unfolding tragedy in mind, The Lebanese Transparency Association has opened new Advocacy and Legal Advice Centres (ALAC) in the Bekaa […]

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Legacy of corruption: a challenge at the ballot box and beyond

On 5 April 12 million Afghanis are expected to vote to select their next president. The leading candidates have expressed their fear of corruption on the day of the election: ballot stuffing, vote buying, impersonation and voter intimidation are likely to resurface as during the last presidential elections. An unfair election will tarnish the legitimacy […]

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Anti-corruption: charting a path for the future

What does the future hold for the fight against corruption? Recently, three books have been written seeking to answer this question, helping to plot the course of the anti-corruption movement for the years to come. Laurence Cockcroft: Global Corruption: Money, Power, and Ethics in the Modern World One of the co-founders of Transparency International, Laurence […]

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MDGs: end corruption to end poverty

International anti-corruption day may have come and gone, but 9 December also offers the chance to look to where else the fight remains to stop the corrupt in their tracks. Nowhere is this more urgent than in the fight against poverty. “To end poverty, you have to end corruption” is a call to action that […]

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Malawi: tackling corruption for a development dividend

Malawi is facing a crisis of confidence. Aid donors, whose contributions make up 40 per cent of the government’s budget, have stopped signing cheques following a corruption scandal that has skimmed off US$250 million that was supposed to be used to help the poor. Not surprisingly, many people are asking what went wrong. What they […]

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Publishing what you fund can stop corruption

The unthinkable just a few years ago is now starting to happen: sunlight is slowly beginning to shine on aid flowing from donors to countries in need. Timely, understandable, accessible and detailed information about what the United States or the United Kingdom is giving – from Afghanistan to Zambia – is starting to be published. […]

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Making climate money work

  This post is authored by Andrew Clarke, Advocacy Manager at Publish What You Fund, which campaigns for aid transparency – more and better information about aid.   Responding to climate change requires massive investment flows. It has been estimated that at least US$ 0.8 trillion will be needed each year for clean energy, transport, energy […]

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Haiti’s hard road to recovery

In the three years since the devastating earthquake killed hundreds of thousands of people and destroyed much of Haiti’s infrastructure we have had to contend with two cyclones, a cholera epidemic and a drought that currently threatens our food security. No wonder Haitians and donors are suffering from reconstruction fatigue when too often the small […]

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What Billions In Illicit And Licit Capital Flight Means For The People Of Zambia

A forthcoming report by Global Financial Integrity finds that Zambia lost US$8.8 billion in illicit financial outflows from 2001-2010

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Does open data make development more accountable? The case of Colombia

Mapping different data sets from a country – with bright colours and click-through functions – may be a visual delight for developers and the tech-savvy, but what do these maps offer those crafting public policies? After all, the point of open data is to make more accountable and effective decision-making – whether it is about […]

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