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OECD sheds light on transnational corruption

This week, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published a ground-breaking report that dissects the massive and mostly hidden phenomenon of transnational corruption. Looking at more than 400 bribery cases across 41 countries that amounted to US$13.8 million per bribe, the report gives a glimpse inside the shadowy world of corrupt practices by […]

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Asia Pacific: growing economies, growing corruption

The 2014 Corruption Perceptions Index scores of countries from Asia Pacific, the world’s fastest growing region, are a resounding message to leaders that, despite many public declarations and commitments, not enough is being done to fight corruption. Out of the 28 Asia Pacific countries in the index, which account for nearly 61 per cent of […]

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The hard business of easy access

News of the arrest of 11 people, including high-ranking public officials, on suspicions of corruption in the issuing of so-called golden visas rocked Portugal this weekend. Officials stand accused of having taken bribes to supply residency permits to preferred millionaire foreign “investors”, revealing just one of the many problems with “Golden Visa” programmes that must […]

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G20 needs to boost banking supervision

Five major banks pay fines for currency manipulation On the eve of the Group of 20 Summit in Brisbane, Australia, a group of the world’s biggest banks have agreed to pay US$4.2 billion in fines to UK, US and Swiss authorities to settle charges that they fixed international currency markets over many years. This agreement […]

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No impunity: the law steps in to investigate

It’s getting harder for Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue to keep getting away with it. The son of the long-serving president of Equatorial Guinea has been forced by the US government to forfeit his cliff-top Malibu mansion, a rare Ferrari and several life-size Michael Jackson statues, all said by the US Department of Justice to have […]

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G20 whistleblowing laws – are they hitting or missing the mark? A lesson from Australia

Legal protection for whistleblowers living in the world’s biggest economies, the Group of 20, is patchy at best and needs to be strengthened to bolster the fight against corruption. The good news is that G20 leaders meeting in Brisbane in November can help make this happen. Ahead of the Brisbane leaders’ summit, Transparency International Australia […]

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G20 Meets to Act on Corporate Taxes – But More Needed on Corruption

The often highly complicated approaches used by giant corporations to lower their tax bills will be under attack at this weekend’s key meeting of finance ministers of the Group of 20 most powerful nations in Cairns, Australia. The G20 is expected to act to end systems where companies like Apple, Amazon, Starbucks and many others […]

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Do settlements for corporate financial malfeasance work?

This week Standard Chartered Bank reached a second settlement with regulators in New York for failing to monitor suspicious financial transactions. It had also promised to tighten up its anti-money laundering processes when it admitted violating US banking rules on transactions with countries under sanction including Sudan and Iran. Perhaps it didn’t get the message. […]

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Why governance matters for development: critics listen up!

The framing is simple but the implications are huge: to end poverty, you have to end corruption. Transparency International has been using this argument since it was founded over 20 years ago. There now appears to be a ground swell of people from the countries which donate the most to development, who agree with us. […]

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G20 anti-corruption meeting: progress, but without ambition

The G20 is making progress in the fight against corruption. However for all the talk, the representatives of the world’s leading economies are not setting the bar high enough. From our point of view, unless the G20 mandates and enforces greater corporate transparency, corrupt public officials, gangsters, drug dealers and terrorists will continue to misuse […]

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